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I would never usually be as presumptuous as to suppose that I knew exactly what my thousands tens of readers wanted to hear me talk about this week, but this is clearly a special occasion. Only one thing has been on everyone's mind since Microsoft quietly updated the list of features that are being removed and/or deprecated in the Windows 10 1709 update, and only that thing would be expected to be the subject of an almost-weekly almost-amusing blog post.

Sunday, 20 August 2017 19:18

Join Me at Experts Live Europe

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Join me at Experts Live Europe on 23 August – 25 August in Berlin, Germany, where experts from around the world present discussion panels, ask-the-experts sessions and breakout sessions and cover the latest products, technologies and solutions from Microsoft. The conference will be held at Berlin Congress Center (bcc). If you aren’t familiar with it, the bcc is a great venue in a historic city that is located in the heart of Europe and the entire Germany’s road network convenes here, along with two airports and train station connected to the venue. The bcc enjoys a central location, hotels and shopping areas are close.

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I have an embarrassment of riches regarding what to talk about this week, but instead, and apologies in advance for sounding like a record stuck in a groove, I am going to talk about Windows as a Service.

More specifically, about the changes to the branches. Microsoft is moving Windows 10 to the same servicing as Windows Server which means that they are transitioning from the Current Branch (CB) and Current Branch for Business (CBB) model of Windows releases to a twice-yearly release cadence called the Semi-Annual Channel. The release cadence will align to Windows Server and Office which means you can expect the updates to arrive in in March and in September, each of which with an 18-month servicing timeline. The Creators Update marks the first of the Semi-Annual Channel releases. Additionally, Microsoft is renaming the Long Term Servicing Branch (LTSB) to the Long-Term Servicing Channel (LTSC).

Friday, 28 July 2017 09:40

Localizing built-in UWP Apps

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Of late, several customers I work with started deploying Windows 10 clients using an English base image and applying language packs in the process. They ran into a little snag involving localizing UWP apps.

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